What can you do now that you’ve listened to “Decolonizing the Land, Liberating the Farmer”?

By: Greg Jobin-Leeds and Thalia Cachimuel

Organizations to Support:

  • Soul Fire Farm is a BIPOC*-centered community farm committed to ending racism and injustice in the food system. They raise and distribute life-giving food as a means to end food apartheid. With deep reverence for the land and wisdom of our ancestors, we work to reclaim our collective right to belong to the earth and to have agency in the food system. They bring diverse communities together on this healing land to share skills on sustainable agriculture, natural building, spiritual activism, health, and environmental justice. They are training the next generation of activist-farmers and strengthening the movements for food sovereignty and community self-determination. Consider a donation here.
  • The Food Project’s mission is to create a thoughtful and productive community of youth and adults from diverse backgrounds who work together to build a sustainable food system.
  • The Farm School connects people to the land by serving as a family farm for the coming generations. We are an organization of three interweaving programs spread out over the land of four old family farms in rural Mass, now linked together under our common stewardship. Careful mentoring, meaningful work, humor and kindness are at the center of all we do.
  • Many Hands Organic Farm has been in existence since 1982 and has been selling to the public since 1985. They were first certified organic by the Massachusetts chapter of the Northeast Organic Farming Association in 1987. To learn more visit their website at https://mhof.net/ 
  • Youth Grow (Youth Growing Organics in Worcester) is an urban agriculture-focused youth development and employment program for low-income teens. YouthGROW employs 32-40 low income high school teens (age 14-18) year-round who gain leadership and jobs skills as they maintain two urban organic farms. YouthGROWers complete a curriculum focused on Professional Development, Leadership Skills, Urban Agriculture, and Social Justice (PLUS,) through participation in the 8-week summer session, monthly workshops, internships, and community service.
  • Soul Fire Farm, cofounded by author, activist, and farmer Leah Penniman, is committed to ending racism and injustice in our food system. Through innovative programs such as the Black-Latinx Farmers Immersion, a sliding-scale farmshare CSA, and Youth Food Justice leadership training, Penniman is part of a global network of farmers working to increase farmland stewardship by people of color, restore Afro-indigenous farming practices, and end food apartheid. 
  • Consider a donation to “Help Fund Black Urban Farmers with Organic Seeds.”
  • National Black Food and Justice Alliance (NBFJA) organizes for black food and land, by increasing the visibility of visionary Black leadership, advancing Black people’s struggle for just and sustainable communities, and building power in our food systems and land stewardship.

Please also support the following well-established Black-led farming organizations:

  • Southeastern African American Organic Farmers Network works to strengthen Black farmers’ collective power to build an alternative food system rooted in progressive values
  • Black Family Land Trust provides educational, technical, and financial services to ensure, protect, and preserve landownership for African Americans and other historically under-served landowners. The BFLT currently works primarily in the Southeastern United States, with active projects in Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina.
  • Black Urban Growers is an organization committed to building networks and community support for growers in both urban and rural settings. Through education and advocacy around food and farm issues, we nurture collective Black leadership to ensure we have a seat at the table. 
  • The Detroit Black Community Food Security Network was formed in February 2006 to address food insecurity in Detroit’s Black community and to organize members of that community to play a more active leadership role in the local food security movement.
  • The Land Loss Prevention Project was founded in 1982 by the North Carolina Association of Black Lawyers to curtail epidemic losses of Black owned land in North Carolina. LLPP was incorporated in the state of North Carolina in 1983.  The organization broadened its mission in 1993 to provide legal support and assistance to all financially distressed and limited resource farmers and landowners in North Carolina. 
  • Farms to Grow promotes the sustainability and legacy of Black farmers as well as sprout the next generation of small farmers.
  • Cooperation Jackson is an emerging vehicle for sustainable community development, economic democracy, and community ownership.
  • Black Oaks Center for Sustainable Renewable Living masters the skills of sustainability. They believe that the creation of a clean, green, plant-based economy awaits us.
  • Truly Living Well is committed to bringing good food, good health and well-being to Atlanta’s urban center.

Read:

“Soul Fire Farm, cofounded by author, activist, and farmer Leah Penniman, is committed to ending racism and injustice in our food system. Through innovative programs such as the Black-Latinx Farmers Immersion, a sliding-scale farmshare CSA, and Youth Food Justice leadership training, Penniman is part of a global network of farmers working to increase farmland stewardship by people of color, restore Afro-indigenous farming practices, and end food apartheid.” 
100% of the profits from this book will be donated to Black Farmers. 

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